It should come as no surprise that fonts are one of the prime elements of a website. They mean quite a lot, even if most developers or designers might not pay due attention. If you own a website, you will deliver content using text made out of a specific font. That font, believe it or not, will be a judge of character, so to speak, for your website and it is extremely essential for you to use the right one. But what would happen if you think you have come across the ‘right’ font, and you do not know which it is.

Tip : 100 Best Free Fonts for Your 2015 Graphic Designs

Well, that is where a host of different font identification tools come in. These tools are available for free, and then there are some for which you have to pay. These tools come in the shape of software, web applications, plugins, extensions and bookmarklets. We took the liberty of all the research and have come up with 15 Brilliant Font Identification Tools for you to check out. If one lets you down, there are countless others for you to try, so make sure you go through all of them. Go through the list and let us know what you think. Your comments are always welcome.

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WhatFontIs

This works pretty much in the same way the previous website works. This is one of the more popular choices out there. This website offers detailed options which include parsing image text based on the color of the background, to make the font better visible. You can either choose to upload an image directly from your computer, or otherwise you may provide a link to where it is hosted online. One of the best features is that you can limit the fonts to those that are free or commercial, and even both.

WhatFontIs

 

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Photoshop Font Detector

If you are into Photoshop, you should be happy of this tool’s existence. This is a plugin that will work with Photoshop and detect any font that you ask it to do. You can download it for free on the website and use it without a hassle, just so long as you have Photoshop. Of course this means that you can extract fonts off of any bitmap, jpeg, or png file you may have. Even PDFs will do, but of course that is a whole another plugin game.

Photoshop Font Detector
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Fount

Fount will easily tell you which web font you are looking at. It will go a step ahead and tell you what size, style and weight the font is carrying. All you need to do is add the concerned font’s page as a bookmark, go to any site and click the Fount bookmarklet, click on the type you need identified and fount will do the rest for you in a jiffy. Of course, you can use the method as many a times as you need.

Fount
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Find my Font

This is an easy to download software offering both free and professional editions. Of course, there will be a few differences in both the version, but it is advised you try the free version to see if you satisfied with the features it offers. This software will run on your computer and identify any fonts through bitmaps, images, and documents etc. They boast having a huge database of fonts which searches in mere seconds.

Find my Font
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Font Genius

This works specifically well for Mackintosh. The company designs differing font tools for both Windows and Mackintosh and they are offering software that will detect the font you want identified with an easy and fast manner. The software will identify the typeface of any text in a given picture using advanced recognition technology, and Font Genius will then produce an entire list of likely possibilities.

Font Genius
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Imagaro Z

Apart from being a rather awesome graphic editor, this handy little tool will allow you to identify virtually any font. Even if they are script fonts or distorted texts. The advanced image recognition that it possesses will surprise you, and it works even where others may fail. Probably one of the better alternatives out there if you are not satisfied with your existing one.

Imagaro Z
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FFFFALLBACK

This is a bookmarklet. It works on a simple concept, however, it will only work on webpages. Once you activate it, it will scan the CSS of a given webpage in order to tell you what font it is using and where. Webfonts are its thing. The best part is that after the magic happens with the CSS, this particular bookmarklet will clone the page and provide you with a tool where you should be able to test different fallback font choices, in case the one you are looking for is not available.

FFFFALLBACK
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WhatTheFont

If you have seen a font in use and are as curious as a cat to find out what that is, you can just visit this website, and it will do the rest for you. All you will need to do is submit an image, and it will search its entire database that comprises of several of fonts, and provide you the answer you are looking for. The images can be PNG, GIF, or JPEG and the maximum upload size allowed is 2 Megabytes.

WhatTheFont
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FontEdge

This particular solution to your typeface problems is not all that popular. You can think of it as a web application. Open the page and you will find a giant white box in front of you. Click anywhere in that box to upload an image. You should then be able to click on the image areas where the font that needs identification lies. You can select different types of fonts from a picture, and then have the ‘application’ identify it. It’s that simple.

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Type Sample

This is a rather simple tool for identifying and sampling webfonts. One look at the website and you will instantly be able to tell that it is rather minimalistic. It works really fast, and involves bookmarks. Chances are, if all the other options for you have failed, this one will definitely deliver.
Type Sample
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WhatFont

If you are willing to give a shot to another bookmarklet, this is the way to go. It is absolutely free and can run directly from your bookmarks. All you need to do is activate the bookmarklet on absolutely an website, and it will work its magic, after which you should be able to tell which font is which. Of course, there is not best option out there. No tool or application can have access to the entirety of fonts available out there especially when there are new ones coming out every second, but you may want to keep multiple options at hand to be more successful.

WhatFont

 

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Fontface Ninja

If you are using Chrome, you are in luck because thanks to their countless plugins, there are few amongst them that can give you the ability to instantly identify fonts. One such plugin is the Fontface Ninja. This particular extension will recognize webfonts instantly, and if possible provide you a download link. By ‘if possible’ we mean if the font is actually available to download.

Fontface Ninja

 

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Context Font

Firefox users need not worry because they also have a handy little extension that can be used to identify fonts. It works the same as the one for Chrome, in that, it will identify a web font for you and provide you with a download as well.

Context Font

 

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Quora

This is more of a forum. It is quite successful at telling you about different fonts, however, it may take a lot longer compare to automated tools. You should be able to ask the community on Quora regarding a font, and people will come forward with answers. As you may know there are communities on Quora, and one such community is typeface identification, which you can use and get answers.

Quora

 

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TypeID

Finally, we have TypeID which is a bulletin board community on Typophile. It has more than 150 pages of archives with loads of threads on fonts. Chances are that if all else have failed, this won’t let you down, of course you may have to spend a lot of time to get your answers.

TypeID

 

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